General

48 Hours Out; Pre-Training Inspection

 

I will have a more complete AAR of the training event in a couple weeks, after I’ve had time to process it. For now, being 48 hours out, I wanted to go over the items I’m taking along.

This is a four day training course at Max Velocity Tactical (MVT). The first day is Rifle Skills, which covers the bases of techniques needed for the following three days. The first day’s content includes:

  • Safety
  • Marksmanship Fundamentals
  • Grouping & Zeroing
  • Weapon Manipulation: malfunctions and stoppages
  • Shooting positions
  • Support side shooting
  • Facing movements / ‘ready ups’
  • Controlled pairs /hammer pairs / stream fire.

The next three days are the Combat Team Tactics course. This is class is designed to teach basic tactical combat rifle and team skills from individual up to pairs and team level. It is part of a training progression that MVT offers, with the next steps including combat patrol, CQB, and even force-on-force training using UTM rounds.

The content for CTT includes:

  • Safety and active muzzle awareness
  • Rifle Manipulation
  • Stoppage Drills
  • Combat Shooting
  • Controlled Pairs, Hammer Pairs, Stream Fire
  • Combat mindset and stress effects
  • Reaction to Contact Drills: RTR & Burst Movement
  • Intro to Patrol Movement
  • Use of Cover
  • Taking & Breaking Cover
  • Observation & Target Identification
  • Buddy Team Fire & Movement
  • Pairs & Team Break Contact Drills
  • Use of the Flank to Assault
  • Introduction to the Squad Hasty Attack

On Attending Tactical Training

This blog has always had an emphasis on marksmanship, and that has been my focus for the last three and a half years. A lot of that emphasis was due to the circumstances of living in California. Prior to that, when I lived in Montana, I spent a lot more time with action shooting (AKA 3-Gun and 2-Gun). While my focus has been on the practical application of marksmanship, I have always been a staunch supporter of the right to keep and bear arms. That includes all aspects of owning firearms, including self defense.

I’ve mentioned before that I am a firm believer in the concept of banding together in times of crisis to protect yourself, your tribe, and your community. If anything, the recent spate of natural disasters should demonstrate the necessity of this position. When things get really bad, someone else coming to help you is not a guarantee (or even really likely).

Attending this kind of training moves me closer to that vision, of being better able to protect my family, friends, and community.

In the end, this is about being a well-rounded gun owner and citizen.

METT-T

If you recall, planning should focus on the principles of METT-T. This is how I am looking at things:

  • Mission: To learn effective rifle fighting and small team tactics for use in emergency situations and to grow as a gun owner and armed citizen advocate. This implies time spent manipulating weapons, maneuvering in and out of various shooting positions, traversing over unknown terrain under load, and retaining information. Possible constraints include lack of prior experience and moderate level of fitness.
  • Enemy: The enemy is time, focus, and complacency. There is a lot of ground to cover in a short period of time, which will strain knowledge retention. Focus and complacency can lead to negligent weapons handling and/or a wrongful assumption that “I’ve got this.”
  • Troops Available: This is primarily about me, but I know roughly how many other students will be attending. I do not know their backgrounds, relative skill levels, or dispositions. Everyone will be well rested. For myself, I have a relatively good grasp of marksmanship fundamentals, which will help me focus on the more tactical portion of the training. I am highly motivated, and physically up for the task.
  • Terrain: The course is taking place in a portion of the country known for difficult terrain. There will be lots of elevation gain/loss during traversal. Lines of sight are restricted by heavy forest. As of this writing, the weather is forecast to be a low of about 50 degrees each night, and a high in the upper-mid 70’s each day. Days are expected to be sunny and without precipitation.
  • Time: Time is not unlimited for this event. There is definitely a curriculum to work through, and a set amount of time to accomplish it. I do not know the itinerary at this point, so there isn’t much I can say here.

The Gear List

MVT presents this gear list for the course:

  • *Fighting Rifle: a semi-automatic battle rifle utilizing detachable magazines of minimum 20 round capacity. AR/AK type platforms are an example of a suitable rifle. The safety must be operable with the firing hand, by finger or thumb, without removing the hand from the pistol grip.
  • Rifle spare parts/spare rifle/optics are useful in case of failures.
  • *The safety selector on your rifle must be easily manipulated with the firing hand.
  • *Rifle magazines (20 or 30 rounds standard capacity): minimum eight.

(Magazine Tip: unique tape on your magazines will help you find and identify them if you drop them on the range).

(Magazine tip: bring as many magazines as you can, pre-loaded, to avoid wasting time loading mags between drills. You will require 4 empty magazines, with loose ammunition, for the first day of the CTT class)

  • *Eye protection
  • *Ear protection: Howard Leight Impact Sport/Pro electronic ear protection, or a similar product, is recommended. These will cancel out the harmful sounds of weapons firing, while allowing you to hear commands. They are excellent for tactical training, and safety.
  • *Load/ammo carrying gear: ‘Load-Out’ i.e. battle belt/plate carrier/tactical vest
  • *Water source: canteen/ camelbak/ water bottles
  • *Bug repellant

That’s the minimum list. My own list from reading AARs from people attending training, both at MVT and elsewhere, includes some more items. Here’s the breakdown.

The Weapon(s) and Ammo

I plan to run this course primarily with my original AR, the 16″ Recce (otherwise known as Ascalon). I’ve swapped back and forth with optics, but I believe I’ve settled on mounting the TR-24 for this. Since I don’t quite know what to expect, the 1-4x variable offers the most versatility between close and ranged targets. It’s a bit funny that I’ve come nearly full circle on this rifle, as it has had all manner optic from the variable, to 2.5-10, to RDS, fixed 4x/3,5x, and now back to the original low power variable.

I am bringing two backup rifles. The first is the 16″ LW KISS, equipped with the Elcan SpecterOS 4x. The second is the musket, equipped with the TA-110. I don’t expect to need them, but at least they (and their optics) will be there.

All weapons have had their optics mounted, dismounted, swapped around, and mounted again. That means they all require zeroing again. I’m hoping to squeeze in the two backups on the same day as the primary.

Strictly speaking, a pistol is not required for this training event. So, I do not plan on bringing one. I realize there is benefit to wear-testing holsters and carry methods to see if it would work, but I can do that on my own time or at some future course.

As far as magazines, I’m bringing 16 PMAG 30s, two PMAG 20s, and a PMAG 10. I don’t think there will be much use for the 20s and 10s beyond initial zeroing, but you never know. I wrapped the bottom of the mags with some blue painters tape, and then wrapped a strip of blaze orange 100 mph tape (to help with finding any dropped mags during various drills). The painters tape will help keep the mag body free of the 100 mph tape residue.

For this event, I picked up 1000 rounds of Magtech 62gr FMJ as well as an additional 500 rounds of American Eagle 55gr.

Load Carriage

I plan to run this event primarily from my medium battle belt. I don’t typically use it, but I’ve added a dump pouch to the rear to help with misc items during training. This belt is supplemented by the MVT chest rig I received late last year.

I will have a backup H-Harness set up just in case. It’s a First Spear Patrolling Harness, which is very similar to the DF-LCS V2 issued to USAF security forces. It’s definitely a touch of the old school, but this style of light infantry training is pretty much exactly what it was designed for. The First Spear harness was effectively designed by the same person (who use to work at Eagle Industries), but with more modern methods (laser-cut webbing, tubes attachments, etc.) I don’t know if it will get any actual use, but I may try to work it in and see how it does.

Clothing

  • There’s not much to put here. I’ll be carting along one beater pair of my old Air Force ABU pants, a pair of TAD Recon AC pants, and TAD Force 10 RS pants. All three are slightly different cuts and styles, so I’ll get a chance to see what works and what doesn’t.
  • For boots, I plan on sticking with my Salomon Jungle Ultras. I will have a pair of Danner Tachyons as backup.
  • Shirts are just a mix of moisture wicking ones I’ve got left over from my time in the Air Force. I will layer as necessary, but plan on having the outermost layer be my Vertx Smock. That enables me to carry a couple more mags in the pockets without having to use the chest rig.
  • For rain gear, I’ll be toting along my issued USAF gore tex jacket as an outermost layer for the really bad stuff (unlikely), and a packable inner jacket that can be worn under the smock if necessary.
  • It’s going to be sunny, so i’ll have hats. I’ve got a mixture of patrol cap style and boonie hats. Situation dependent.
  • It’s cheesy, but I’m bringing two shemaghs. They’ve been great in the past on sunny days for helping keep my neck from burning.

Protective Gear

  • Ear pro is a set of Howard Leights and some foamie ear plugs. I’ll bring along a spare set of Peltors, but the ones I’ve got have not worked right in a long time (the microphone/speakers don’t power up).
  • My eyewear is the same set of Revision Sawflys I’ve been using for years. I’ll bring a backup set of glasses as well.
  • I’ve been warned that there is a lot of getting up and down from kneeling, and that knee pads are recommended. The easiest route would have been foam inserts for pants, but only one pair of my pants can accept them. I’ll be taking a set of Alta Superflex pads.
  • For gloves, I plan to stick with my PIG FDT Alphas, with a set of Mechanix as backup.

Misc Supporting Gear

In addition to the load carriage equipment, which I’ve previously discussed, there is some extra support gear I’ll have.

  • I’m bringing two slings, the BFG Padded Vickers, and FTW multipurpose.
  • SORD shooting mat for the first day, where I expect a good bit of being on the ground.
  • GoRuck GR1 for extra “stuff.”
  • Folding stool, because sitting is nice.
  • Rite in the Rain notebook(s) for taking notes.
  • Leatherman MUT
  • Flashlight
  • Spool of paracord
  • Spool of #36 bank line
  • Canteen x 2
  • Source 3L water bladder

And Here we Go

This is a much different experience than the Appleseed I did a couple years back. I look forward to reporting back with an AAR.

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